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Vol. 13 - No. 86
Tuesday, March 28th, 2017
January 10, 2011

Science

Generated on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 02:42 PM

Small moth with yellowish coif named after Donald Trump

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 04:35 PM

Small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi and named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump(Reuters) - A small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales has been named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump, in honor of the former reality TV show host and real estate magnate's signature hairdo. The new species, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi, lives in a habitat that spans southern California and Mexico's Baja California and was named by evolutionary biologist Vazrick Nazari in an article published in the scientific journal ZooKeys. The moth, the second species of a genus of twirler moths, can be distinguished by the yellowish-white scales on the head of its adults, according to the journal.


World temperatures hit new high in 2016 for third year in a row

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 09:34 AM

FILE PHOTO: People cool off in fountains as hot summer temperatures hit ParisBy Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016, creeping closer to a ceiling set for global warming with extremes including unprecedented heat in India and ice melt in the Arctic, U.S. government agencies said on Wednesday. The data, supported by findings from other organizations, was issued two days before the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, who questions whether climate change has a human cause. Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 degrees Celsius (1.69 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 20th-century average of 13.9C (57.0F), according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


Hemp hits new high as building material on Dutch bridge

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 11:05 AM

By Jim Drury EINDHOVEN, Netherlands (Reuters) - While plenty of cannabis goes up in smoke in coffee shops around the Netherlands, Dutch researchers have found a new use for it - as an environmentally friendly building material to rival cement or steel. "Actually it's the first 'bio-based' bridge in the world, as far as we know," said Rijk Blok, an assistant professor of structural design at the Eindhoven University of Technology. The hemp and flax fibers are combined in a resin that is stuck to a core made of polylactic acid, a polymer also made of plant material, to form the span of the 14-metre (46-foot) bridge over a stream on the university campus.

Europe's oncologists back biosimilar versions of cancer drugs

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 08:28 AM

(Reuters) - Europe's leading association of oncologists has thrown its weight behind cheaper copycat versions of biotech cancer drugs that have lost patent protection, saying they are effective and affordable. Off-patent chemical medicines have for decades been copied with precision and sold as cheap generic versions, but drug regulators have only over recent years embraced copycat versions of complex biological drugs, known as biosimilars. "Biosimilars are must-have weaponry in financially sustaining healthcare systems on a global scale as well as significantly improving outcomes for an increasing number of patients throughout Europe and the rest of the world," ESMO President Professor Fortunato Ciardiello said in a statement.

Antarctic ice floe crack forces UK scientists to leave

Published: Tuesday, January 17, 2017 09:41 AM

Halley VI Research Station modules at the old site_The decision was taken after a huge crack appeared in the Brunt Ice Shelf, just 10 miles away from the Halley VI research station. "We want to do the right thing for our people,” said Captain Tim Stocking, Director of Operations at the British Antarctic Society (BAS). "Bringing them home for winter is a prudent precaution given the changes that our glaciologists have seen in the ice shelf in recent months." There are currently 88 scientists stationed at the Halley VI research centre, which monitors climate data and played a key role in discovering the ozone hole in 1986.


Mold Inside Sophie the Giraffe Toys: Should Parents Worry?

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 08:44 AM

Mold Inside Sophie the Giraffe Toys: Should Parents Worry?Some parents recently got a shocking sight when they cut open their child's favorite teething toy, Sophie the Giraffe: The toy's innards were teeming with mold. This week, Good Housekeeping reported several instances of parents cutting open Sophie the Giraffe and finding mold inside the toy. Now, a number of parents have taken to social media to share their pictures of Sophie's insides filled with black mold.


Skin Medication Can Be Lethal for Pets, FDA Warns

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 08:44 AM

Skin Medication Can Be Lethal for Pets, FDA WarnsA cream used to treat skin cancer and abnormal skin lesions can be lethal for pets, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today. The agency said the medication, called fluorouracil, can make pets sick, and even kill them in some cases. "People using this medication should use care when applying and storing the medication if they are also in a household with pets, as even very small amounts could be dangerous to these animals," the FDA said in a statement.


President Bush in the ICU: Why Does Pneumonia Strike Older Adults?

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 08:44 AM

President Bush in the ICU: Why Does Pneumonia Strike Older Adults?Former President George H.W. Bush was hospitalized on Jan. 14 following a bout of pneumonia, CNN reported today (Jan. 18). In addition, Bush's wife, former first lady Barbara Bush, was admitted to the hospital today as a precaution because she was experiencing "fatigue and coughing," according to CNN. The 41st president turned 92 last summer, and Barbara Bush is 91.


Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos

Published: Thursday, November 26, 2015 06:40 AM

Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.


Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in Space

Published: Thursday, November 26, 2015 06:40 AM

Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.


Scientists will live in a dome for 8 months to simulate Mars

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 09:11 PM

Scientists will live in a dome for 8 months to simulate MarsSix carefully selected scientists have entered a man-made dome on a remote Hawaii volcano as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions ...


California scientist names moth species after Donald Trump

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 12:27 PM

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A scientist in California has named a newly discovered moth species after President-elect Donald Trump, saying the white and yellow scales on the insect's head are reminiscent of Trump's blond hairdo.

Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 08:01 AM

Cracks are seen on the Fourcade glacier near Argentina's Carlini Base in AntarcticaThe glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.


Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change

Published: Thursday, January 19, 2017 07:06 AM

The glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.

Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect days

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 08:46 AM

FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2013 file photo, a child plays with a ball next to a couple posing for a photographer in a park outside Bucharest, Romania. Newlywed couples took advantage of the unusual warm weather for the month of November, with temperatures reaching 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), for outdoor photo sessions. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio Images

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 07:00 AM

Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio ImagesThe sprawling ground-based telescope is more usually used to probe radio waves released by some of the universe's most distant galaxies. In this case, though, it picked up waves released by the sun's chromosphere, which is the area just above the surface you see in visible light. Images returned by detecting radio waves at 2.5 and 3 millimeters show conditions at two different chromosphere depths — and the new views could lend more insight into the sun's physics.


Global warming could steal postcard-perfect weather days

Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 12:30 AM

Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect daysWASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


"Pragmatic" Trump might be persuaded on climate action - UK scientists

Published: Monday, January 16, 2017 12:37 PM

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBy Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London.


'Pragmatic' Trump might be persuaded on climate action: UK scientists

Published: Monday, January 16, 2017 11:57 AM

By Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London.

'Pragmatic' Trump might be persuaded on climate action - UK scientists

Published: Monday, January 16, 2017 11:30 AM

By Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London.

UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency

Published: Sunday, January 15, 2017 09:47 PM

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency

Published: Sunday, January 15, 2017 06:08 PM

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at a "Thank You USA" tour rally in Grand RapidsBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency

Published: Sunday, January 15, 2017 06:07 PM

A view under the Altesch Glacier where ice melts inside a glacier cave in FieschBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


12 Years Later, Scientists Remember Epic Landing on Saturn Moon Titan

Published: Saturday, January 14, 2017 01:00 PM

12 Years Later, Scientists Remember Epic Landing on Saturn Moon TitanAs NASA's Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft begins its final eight months of operation, scientists are looking back at one of the mission's most dramatic moments: the landing of the piggyback Huygens probe on the huge moon Titan. Huygens touched down on Titan's frigid surface on Jan. 14, 2005, three weeks after separating from the Cassini mothership. "The Huygens descent and landing represented a major breakthrough in our exploration of Titan as well as the first soft landing on an outer-planet moon," Cassini project scientist Linda Spilker, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.


The Science of Beauty: What's Really Driving the Fuller Lip Trend?

Published: Saturday, January 14, 2017 12:34 PM

The Science of Beauty: What's Really Driving the Fuller Lip Trend?A quick scroll through Instagram may leave you with the impression that full lips are in style at this very moment, but a new scientific analysis of fashion models says that the trend is surprisingly absent. One explanation for the results may be that the fashion industry is no longer driving beauty trends — instead, it’s possible that celebrities may be the new driving factor instead, according to the study. However, the fashion industry has often played a role in what women seek from cosmetic procedures, the authors wrote in the study.


Stem Cells Could Restore Vision After Eye Disease

Published: Friday, January 13, 2017 08:51 AM

Stem Cells Could Restore Vision After Eye DiseaseResearchers used stem cells to grow new retina tissue in a lab, and then transplanted that tissue into mice that had end-stage retinal degeneration. More than 40 percent of the mice gained the ability to see light as the result of the procedure, the researchers said. "We were at first very excited to see that the transplants do robustly respond to light," Dr. Michiko Mandai, the first author of the paper and a deputy project leader at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan, told Live Science.


Green Glow from Ancient Galaxies Surprises Scientists

Published: Friday, January 13, 2017 06:00 AM

Green Glow from Ancient Galaxies Surprises ScientistsThe galaxies are greener on the other side of the universe, it seems: A new analysis reveals that some of the most distant galaxies ever observed are radiating green light, a finding that could deeply affect developing models of those early galaxies. Researchers have seen this same kind of green light coming from a few galaxies in the nearby universe, but, according to Malkin, the "shocking" part of the new analysis is in the number of galaxies involved: The green light that researchers observed in the new study appears to be coming from most or all of the galaxies that formed in the first 1 billion or 2 billion years of the universe.


BRIEF-Uni-Bio Science Group Ltd says Tong Kit Shing has ceased to be executive director, chairman

Published: Friday, January 13, 2017 05:42 AM

Jan 13 (Reuters) - Uni-Bio Science Group Ltd * Tong Kit Shing has retired and ceased to be an executivedirector, chairman of board * Kingsley Leung has been appointed as chairman of board * Chen Dawei has been appointed as an executive director,vice-chairman of boardSource text for Eikon: Further company coverage:

Your Drunken Urge for Pizza and Wings, Explained by Science

Published: Thursday, January 12, 2017 09:01 AM

Your Drunken Urge for Pizza and Wings, Explained by ScienceNow, a new study in mice may offer a possible explanation for this desire to overeat: Alcohol may activate some of the brain cells that normally make people feel hungry. Although the study was conducted in mice, the findings likely apply to people as well because humans have the same types of neurons in their brains as the neurons the researchers focused on in the study, said Jessica R. Barson, an assistant professor of neurobiology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, who was not involved in the study. Previous research has shown that people tend to overeat after drinking alcohol — a phenomenon dubbed "the apéritif effect" — but it was not clear what the potential biological reasons for this link might be.


Scientists hear voice of ancient humans in baboon calls

Published: Thursday, January 12, 2017 06:24 AM

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2015 file photo, Sahara, a rare red-haired female Hamadryas Baboon holds 3 weeks old dark-furred baby in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel. A new study in France shows that baboons can make human-like vowel sounds, and its authors say the discovery could help scientists better understand the evolution of human speech. The study was published in the journal Plos One on Wednesday Jan. 11, 2017 by a team of scientists. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)PARIS (AP) — Baboon grunts and mating calls may hold secrets about human speech, according to a new study suggesting that the origins of human language could reach back as much as 25 million years.


1 Japanese, 2 Americans win Crafoord science prize

Published: Thursday, January 12, 2017 03:34 AM

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A Japanese and two American scientists have been awarded the 2017 Crafoord Prize for fundamental discoveries in immune regulation.

Scientists: Moon over the hill at 4.51 billion years old

Published: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 07:06 PM

FILE - In this June 20, 2016 file photo, the full moon rises behind a tree next to the ruins of the ancient marble Temple of Poseidon, built in 444 BC, at Cape Sounion, southeast of Athens, on the eve of the summer solstice. On Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, a California-led research team reported that the moon formed within 60 million years of the birth of the solar system. Previous estimates ranged within 100 million years, all the way out to 200 million years of the solar system’s creation. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — It turns out the moon is older than many scientists suspected: a ripe 4.51 billion years old.


How Old Is the Moon? Scientists Say They Finally Know

Published: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 01:01 PM

How Old Is the Moon? Scientists Say They Finally KnowThe moon is a very old soul, it turns out. A new analysis of lunar rocks brought to Earth by Apollo astronauts suggests that the moon formed 4.51 billion years ago — just 60 million years after the solar system itself took shape. Some previous studies have come up with similar estimates, while others have argued for a younger moon that coalesced 150 million to 200 million years after the solar system was born.


Antarctic Science Lab On the Move to Escape Breaking Ice

Published: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 09:46 AM

Antarctic Science Lab On the Move to Escape Breaking IceA British scientific base in Antarctica is on the move to a new location, to avoid being cut adrift by a crack in a floating ice shelf. The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) announced on New Year's Eve that the first module of the Halley VI Research Station was towed by tractors to a new site on the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica's Weddell Sea, 14 miles (23 kilometers) east of its former location. The remaining seven main buildings of the modular research base will be towed to the new site over the coming weeks, as the relocation team takes advantage of the 24 hours of daylight during the brief Antarctic summer.


2017 Total Solar Eclipse: A Magnet for Scientists ... and Hordes of People

Published: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 03:55 PM

2017 Total Solar Eclipse: A Magnet for Scientists ... and Hordes of PeopleThe 2017 total solar eclipse, which will be visible across the contiguous United States, will be a scientific marvel and a potentially life-changing experience for people who view it. The eclipse was a hot topic of discussion Dec. 3 through Dec. 8 at the 229th meeting of the American Astronomical Society.


New Illumina tech could usher in $100 gene-sequencing era

Published: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 11:42 AM

The offices of gene sequencing company Illumina Inc are shown in San Diego, California(Reuters) - Shares of Illumina Inc rose 16 percent on Tuesday, after the company unveiled new technology, which is expected to eventually reduce the cost of sequencing to $100 per human genome, prompting a slew of price target increases. It took government-funded scientists $3 billion and 13 years to sequence the first human genome by 2003. Illumina on Monday unveiled its NovaSeq sequencing platform, which is expected to deliver three-times faster and twenty percent cheaper sequencing over existing models.


Scientists find clues to why binge-drinking causes binge-eating

Published: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:20 AM

Scientists have found that the brain cells in mice that stimulate the urge to eat can be activated by alcohol as well as by hunger - a discovery that could help explain why binge drinking often leads to binge eating. In an experiment, mice subjected to a three-day "alcoholic weekend" were found to eat significantly more food than mice that stayed sober. The results, published in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday, show that major components of the brain's feeding circuits are activated by alcohol, the researchers said.

Forget About Global Warming Pause — It Doesn't Exist

Published: Monday, January 9, 2017 11:06 AM

Forget About Global Warming Pause — It Doesn't ExistForget about the so-called climate change hiatus — a period beginning in 1998 when the increase in the planet's temperature reportedly slowed — it doesn't exist, according to a new study that found the planet's ocean temperatures are warming faster than previously thought. "Our results mean that essentially NOAA got it right, that they were not cooking the books," study lead author Zeke Hausfather, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley's Energy and Resources Group.


Zombies Would Wipe Out Humans in Less than 100 Days

Published: Saturday, January 7, 2017 07:47 AM

Zombies Would Wipe Out Humans in Less than 100 DaysThe zombie apocalypse won't take long. A new article in a peer-reviewed student journal finds that the zombie hordes would take Earth's population down to a mere 273 survivors in 100 days. The paper, published in the University of Leicester's Journal of Physics Special Topics, was a fanciful use of the so-called SIR model, which is used in epidemiology to simulate how diseases spread over time.



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